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MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY’S NAMED PLACES, SPACES AND UNITS

ACADEMIC-ATHLETIC CENTER – Built in 1981, this multi-purpose facility includes Johnson Arena, a 6,500-seat basketball and special events arena, McClure Pool, Mack Diving Well, Len Miller Room, academic study center, computer laboratory, and offices of the University’s intercollegiate athletics program. The site of spring and winter commencement ceremonies, it was named to reflect its dual function of academics and athletics.

ADMISSIONS CENTER – Acquired and renovated in 2004, this two-story office building houses Enrollment Services, including admissions and financial aid and representatives of the registrar and business office. Its name reflects its purpose.

ADRON DORAN UNIVERSITY CENTER – Built in 1956 on the site of the first campus building, this three-story building was expanded in 1969 and was renovated and expanded in 2005. Originally known as the Doran Student House, it was named in honor of Dr. Adron Doran, seventh president of the University, who served from 1954 to 1977. It includes the Commonwealth, Crager, Heritage and Riggle rooms, University Bookstore, Post Office, administrative offices and other facilities.

ADULT EDUCATION ACADEMY – Established in 2002 with grant funds from the Kentucky Department of Adult Education and Literacy, this unit is based at the Brumagen House. Its full name is the Adult Education Academy for Professional Development.

ADULT LEARNING CENTER – Located in leased facilities on Main Street in downtown Morehead, the center operates on a state grant and provides basic literacy services to adults. Another adult learning center is operated by the University in West Liberty.

ALLEN FIELD – Built in 1974 as the first baseball stadium on a college campus in Kentucky, John (Sonny) Allen Field was named in honor of the University’s winningest baseball coach, former basketball All-American and assistant athletic director. The grandstand contains about 1,000 permanent seats. Lights were added in 1998 as a gift from alumnus Willie Blair, a former major league pitcher. The grandstand, locker rooms and offices were renovated in 2004 and the playing field was upgraded in 2005.

ALLIE YOUNG HALL – Built in 1926 and renovated in 1976, this four-story structure served as a residence hall before it was renovated to become a student services building. It includes the Caudill Health Clinic and was named in honor of former Sen. Allie Young of Morehead, also a former judge, who is recognized as one of the founders of the University as a public institution. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The clinic was named for Wilma Caudill, longtime director.
 
ALUMNI CENTER – Built in 1972 with funds given by alumni of the University, this two-story facility houses offices of the Division of University Advancement.

ALUMNI TOWER – Built in 1967, this eight-story men’s residence hall was upgraded in 1999 to improve fire safety and totally renovated in 2009-10.  A food court and convenience store occupy the ground floor. It was named in honor of the University’s more than 50,000 graduates. 

ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME – Located in the front lobby of the Academic-Athletic Center, it contains engraved likenesses of  former coaches, student-athletes and administrators who excelled in athletics at the University. New members are enshrined each year.

BAIRD MUSIC HALL – Built in 1954 and expanded in 1967, this three-story classroom and office building was named in honor of Dr. William Jesse Baird, fifth president of the University. It includes Duncan Recital Hall and Fulbright Auditorium.

BATTSON-OATES DRIVE – Extending from University Boulevard near Breckinridge Hall, this street runs westerly to Fifth Street and then southerly to Main Street. Its name resulted from a merger of Ward Oates Drive, named for a former state highway commissioner, and Battson Avenue, named for former Morehead mayor Hartley Battson.

BOOKSTORE – Also known as the University Bookstore, it is located on the ground floor of the Adron Doran University Center.

BREATHITT SPORTS CENTER – Built primarily between 1964 and 1987, this complex of athletic facilities includes the Academic-Athletic Center, Jayne Stadium, Allen Field, Sadler Courts, Dawson Track, and the Women’s Softball Field. The area was named in honor of former Gov. Edward T. Breathitt, also a former vice chair of the Board of Regents.

BRECKINRIDGE HALL – Built in 1931, expanded in 1965 and renovated and expanded in 2002, this four-story classroom and office building was named in honor of Robert J. Breckinridge, former state school superintendent. Previously known as Breckinridge Training School and University Breckinridge School, it was used for 51 years as the University’s laboratory for teacher training. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

BRUMAGEN HOUSE – Acquired in 1991, the former residence is used for offices of the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree program. It bears the name of Dr. David Brumagen, former faculty member and previous owner.

BUTLER HALL – Built in 1961 and upgraded in 2003 to improve fire safety, this four-story coed residence hall was named in honor of Wendell P. Butler, former state school superintendent and former chair of the Board of Regents. It houses the University’s Honors Leadership Residential College.

BUTTON AUDITORIUM – Built in 1928, renovated in 1968 and upgraded in 2005 with new seating, this three-story facility contains classrooms and offices and a 1,200-seat auditorium. It was the site of the University’s first gymnasium which was transformed into classroom and laboratory facilities for Army ROTC. It was named in honor of Frank C. Button, first president of the University, who served from 1922 to 1929. The facility includes an indoor range which is used by the Eagle rifle team. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

CAMDEN-CARROLL LIBRARY – Built in 1931, expanded in 1965 and again in 1978, this five-story structure was named in honor of former U.S. Sen. Johnson Camden and former Gov. Julian M. Carroll. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  It encompasses the Ione Chapman Reading Room, Jesse Stuart Room, James Still Room and Roger W. Barbour Room.

CARTMELL HALL – Built in 1969, this 16-story coed residence hall was upgraded in 1999 to improve fire safety. It was named in honor of Dr. William H. Cartmell of Maysville, the first private citizen to serve as chair of the University's Board of Regents.

CAUDILL COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES – Headquartered at Rader Hall, the college consists of seven academic departments. It was named in honor of the family of Daniel Boone Caudill, former judge and businessman in Elliott and Rowan counties.

CAUDILL HEALTH CLINIC – Located on the second level of Allie Young Hall, this facility houses the staff of the Office of Counseling and Health Services. It was named in honor of Wilma Caudill, a former staff member.

CHANDLER PLACE – Extending from Earle Clements Lane through the residence hall complex around Alumni Tower, this street was named in honor of former Gov. Albert B. Chandler.

CLAYPOOL-YOUNG ART BUILDING – Built in 1968, this three-story classroom and office building includes a tri-level art gallery. It was named in honor of former art faculty members Naomi Claypool and Thomas Young. Ms. Claypool also was chair of the department.  It includes the Strider Gallery.

COMBS BUILDING – Built in 1962 and partially renovated in 2003, this four-story classroom and office building was named in honor of former Gov. Bert T. Combs. It includes Kibbey Seminar Room and White Conference Room.
 
COMMONWEALTH ROOM
– Located on the top floor of the Adron Doran University Center, this dining/meeting room was named in honor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It previously was known as the Red Room.

COOPER HALL – Built in 1965, this four-story men’s residence hall was upgraded in 2000 to improve fire safety. It was named in honor of former U.S. Sen. John Sherman Cooper.

CORA WILSON STEWART MOONLIGHT SCHOOLHOUSE – Acquired as a gift in 1972, this authentic one-room school was located adjacent to Breckinridge Hall for several years before being moved in 2001 to a spot near the public library in downtown Morehead. It was named in honor of Cora Wilson Stewart, the founder of adult education in the U.S., a former school superintendent in Rowan County and an MSU alumnus.

CRAGER ROOM – Created in 1969 with the expansion of the Adron Doran University Center, this ballroom was named in honor of Buford Crager, former vice president and faculty member.

CROSTHWAIT PLAZA – Situated between Ginger Hall and Rader Hall, this outdoor space was named in 1996 in honor of the Crosthwait family of Rowan County and in response to a gift from alumni Ted and Jean Crosthwait.

DAVID MAGRANE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LABORATORY - Located on the ground floor of Lappin Hall, this core research facility was established in 2007 in space previously occupied by the Cornucopia Room foods laboratory.  It was named in honor of Dr. David Magrane, former department chair and faculty member.

DAWSON TRACK – Constructed in 1965 as a component of Jayne Stadium, this quarter-mile oval was named in honor of A. L. Dawson, former track and cross country coach.

DERRICKSON AGRICULTURAL COMPLEX – Also known as the University Farm, this 320-acre layout on KY 377 (Cranston Road) north of I-64 was acquired in 1967. Facilities include the Richardson Livestock Arena, Equine Health Education Center, veterinary technology laboratory and more than two dozen other structures. The complex was named in honor of Dr. Charles M. Derrickson, former college dean.

DOWNING HALL – Built in 1967 as a residence hall for student-athletes, this two-story facility was named for George Dewey Downing, the University’s first coach and athletic director. It is now used for various offices and storage.

DUNCAN RECITAL HALL – Built in 1967 as a component of the expansion of Baird Music Hall, this 350-seat venue was named in honor of Dr. J. E. Duncan, former college dean and faculty member.

EAGLE LAKE – Created in 1950 with the impoundment of Evans Branch on the northern edge of the campus, this pristine, 30-acre lake was named for the majestic symbol of the University, the American Bald Eagle. Except for a small portion at the north end where Evans Branch empties into the lake, the shoreline property is owned by the University.

EAGLE LAKE APARTMENTS – Built in 2002, this three-story structure contains 28 student apartments. It was named for its proximity to Eagle Lake.

EAGLE VETERANS MONUMENT – Located near the Little Bell Tower, this monument was erected in memory of all alumni who have died as a result of military service. It also serves as the University’s designated free speech area.  It includes a marker honoring Marine Capt. William E. Barber, MSU alumnus, who received the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism in the Korean War.

EAGLE TRACE GOLF COURSE – Acquired in 2007 as a gift from the MSU Foundation, Inc., this 18-hole championship golf course measures 6,902 yards of rolling woodlands. The par 72 layout is located off KY 801 near Interstate 64. It was named by previous owners for its location on the migratory bird flyway near Cave Run Lake.

EARLE CLEMENTS LANE – Extending in a northerly direction from Battson-Oates Drive to Eagle Lake, this street was named in honor of Earle C. Clements, former governor and U.S. senator.

EAST MIGNON HALL – Built in 1965, this six-story residence hall was upgraded in 2001 to improve fire safety. It was named for Mignon M. Doran, wife of the seventh president of the University and a former faculty member.

EDGAR TOLSON FOLK ART LIBRARY – Located on the second floor of the Kentucky Folk Art Center, this facility was named in honor of East Kentucky folk artist Edgar Tolson of Wolfe County.

EVANS BRANCH DRIVE – Originally known as Lakewood Terrace Drive, this street extends from Earle Clements Lane to Eagle Lake Apartments. It was named for the stream impounded to create Eagle Lake.

EXELBIRT SEMINAR ROOM – Located on the third floor of Rader Hall, this room was named in honor of Dr. Wilhelm Exelbirt, former faculty member and first recipient of the Distinguished Teacher Award.

FIELDS HALL – Built in 1926 and renovated in 1990, this three-story, coed, upper-class, academic honors residence hall was named in honor of Dora J. Fields of Olive Hill, first woman member of the Board of Regents and wife of former Gov. William J. Fields. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

FLAG PLAZA – Built in 2002 in front of the Howell-McDowell Administration Building, the plaza includes the American, Kentucky and University flags on permanent display. It was erected by the Student Government Association as a statement of patriotic pride in response to the events of 9-11-01.
 
FULBRIGHT REHEARSAL HALL – A component of Baird Music Hall, this 500-seat facility is used primarily for music ensemble rehearsals. It was named for Dr. Glenn Fulbright, former department chair and faculty member.

GILLEY APARTMENTS – Acquired in 1971 as faculty-staff housing, this two-story, 10-unit apartment building now is used by campus fraternities. It was named in honor of Charles Gilley, former member of the Board of Regents.

GINGER HALL – Built in 1968, this nine-story classroom and office building was named in honor of Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, former state school superintendent and former chair of the Board of Regents. It houses the office of the dean of the College of Education.

GLIMCHER WETLANDS – Acquired in 1989 as a gift from The Glimcher Co., to replace wetlands lost to a commercial development in Ashland, this 30-acre property is located on KY 1722, about seven miles west of Morehead. It is used for MSU faculty and students for agricultural and biological field research.

GROTE-THOMPSON HALL – Built in 1926 and renovated in 1991, this four-story, coeducational residence hall was named originally in honor of J. H. Thompson, former speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. The name of Dr. C. Nelson Grote, 11th president of MSU, was added to the structure in 2008.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

HAMILTON COSTUME SHOP – Located in Breckinridge Hall, this support facility for the theatre program was named in 2004 for Kozy Hamilton, longtime costumer.

HAMM SPEECH SUITE – Located in Breckinridge Hall, this office complex was named in 2004 in memory of Harlen Hamm, former faculty member.

HEATING AND WATER PLANT – Built in 1935 as the central heating plant, a water treatment plant was added in 1960. The exterior was renovated in 1994 to improve appearances. Its name reflects its purpose.

HENRY WARD PLACE – Extending in a northwesterly direction from Battson-Oates Drive, this street was named for Henry T. Ward, a former state highway commissioner.

HERITAGE ROOM – Previously known as the Gold Room, this dining and meeting room is located on the top floor of the Adron Doran University Center. It was named to reflect its décor of locally-grown hardwood and historic displays, including portraits of the 12 previous presidents of the University.
 
HONORS HOUSE
– Acquired in 1997, this three-story former residence houses the George M. Luckey Academic Honors Program. Its name reflects its purpose.

HOWELL-McDOWELL ADMINISTRATION BUILDING – Built in 1963 and expanded in 1965, this three-story office structure houses the offices of the president and three vice presidents. It was named in honor of Cloyd T. McDowell of Harlan and Jerry F. Howell Sr. of Jackson, former members of the Board of Regents. Mr. Howell also served as board chair.

IONE CHAPMAN READING ROOM – Located in the Periodicals Section of Camden-Carroll Library, this room was named in honor of Ione Chapman, director of libraries from 1946 to 1968. It was dedicated in 1992.

JAMES STILL ROOM – Located in the Special Collections section of Camden-Carroll Library, this room contains literary material by its namesake, the late author James Still of Knott County, a former faculty member and poet laureate of Kentucky.
 
JAYNE STADIUM – Built in 1964, this facility is the home of the University’s football and soccer teams. It was upgraded with artificial turf in 1986 and again in 2001. The playing surface is known as Terry and Susan Jacobs Field in honor of their gifts of the turf installations. The stadium was named in honor of W.L. Jayne, former administrator and faculty member. It includes Dawson Track and Simms Weight Training Center.

JESSE STUART ROOM – Located in the Special Collections section of Camden-Carroll Library, this room contains literary material by its namesake, Kentucky author Jesse Stuart of Greenup County, former state poet laureate.

JIMMIE RUTH AUDITORIUM – Located on the main floor of the Kentucky Folk Art Center, this 40-seat facility was named in honor of Jimmie Ruth, Morehead businessman.

JOHNSON ARENA – The major component of the Academic-Athletic Center, this 6,500-seat facility is home to the University’s men’s and women’s basketball teams. It was named in honor of Ellis T. Johnson, former basketball and football coach, athletic director and a founder of the Ohio Valley Conference.

KENTUCKY CENTER FOR TRADITIONAL MUSIC – A unit created for the preservation and appreciation of traditional (acoustic and vocal) music, KCTM is part of the University’s cultural outreach effort. It is housed in leased facilities on Main Street in downtown Morehead. Its name reflects its statewide mission.

KENTUCKY FOLK ART CENTER – Acquired in 1995 and renovated in 1997, this two-story structure houses the only folk art museum in Kentucky. It previously was used as a wholesale grocery warehouse. Components include the Minnie and Garland Adkins Gallery, William and Lovena Richardson Gallery, Jimmie Ruth Auditorium and Edgar Tolson Folk Art Library. Its name reflects its statewide mission.

KIBBEY SEMINAR ROOM – Located on the ground level of the Combs Classroom Building, this 40-seat theatre-style room was named in honor of Sam F. Kibbey of Ashland, a former member of the Board of Regents. Before being renovated and modified in 2003, it was known as Kibbey Theatre.

LAKEWOOD TERRACE – Built between 1960 and 1962, the 10 original, two-story apartment structures were named for the first faculty and staff of the University and former U.S. Rep. Carl D. Perkins. Three of the structures were demolished in 2001 to provide space for Eagle Lake Apartments. Four others were leveled in 2003 and the remaining units came down in 2007.  

LAPPIN HALL – Built in 1937, expanded in 1967 and 1993 and renovated in 1996, this four-story classroom, laboratory and office structure was named in honor of Dr. Warren C. Lappin, former academic vice president and faculty member and two-time acting president. It includes the West Science Museum.

LARRY NETHERTON PRODUCTION ROOM -- Named for a former general manager of WMKY and faculty member, Larry J. Netherton, the space contains digital audio production facilities.

LARRY WILSON BOWLING LANES - Constructed in 1967 as part of the Laughlin Health Building, this six-lane facility was named in 2008 in honor of Larry Wilson, former faculty member and longtime coach of the University's men's and women's bowling teams.

LAUGHLIN HEALTH BUILDING – Built in 1967, this two-story classroom, laboratory and office building was named in honor of Robert (Bobby) G. Laughlin, former basketball coach, athletic director and faculty member. It houses the Larry Wilson Bowling Lanes, home of the University’s nationally-prominent bowling teams.

LEN MILLER ROOM – Named in honor of Len Miller, a former basketball coach who died while in service to the University, this dining/meeting room is located off the front lobby of the Academic-Athletic Center. A bronze bust of Coach Miller stands nearby, a tribute from his family and former players.

LITTLE BELL TOWER – Built in 1997 as a gift from Lucille Caudill Little, this four-story bell tower features an electronic carillon controlled by a computer in the library. It was named in honor of Mrs. Little, a former faculty member and her husband, W. Paul Little, Lexington philanthropists.

LLOYD CASSITY BUILDING – Built in 1962, this three-story classroom and office structure was named in honor of Lloyd Cassity of Ashland, former chair of the Board of Regents. It includes the Student Technology Center.

LOVENA AND WILLIAM RICHARDSON GALLERY – Located on the main floor of the Kentucky Folk Art Center, this exhibition space was named in honor of the former owners of the building.

LUCILLE LITTE THEATRE – Built in 2002 as a component of the renovated and expanded Breckinridge Hall, this “black box” theatre laboratory was named in honor of Lucille Caudill Little, a former faculty member and founder of the theatre program.

MARGARET LEWIS LEARNING CENTER -- This computer laboratory at MSU at Prestonsburg was named for Dr. Margaret Lewis, former director of the regional campus.

MAYS HALL APARTMENTS – Built in 1937 as a residence hall and renovated in 1992 and converted to 47 student apartments, this four-story structure was named in honor of Jesse T. Mays, former faculty member.

McCLURE POOL – A component of the Academic-Athletic Center, this Olympic-sized swimming pool was named for Russell R. McClure, former MSU vice president and state finance secretary. The pool includes the Bill Mack Diving Well, named in honor of a former coach and faculty member.

MEMORIAL PLAZA – Located in the vicinity of the Little Bell Tower, this area contains engraved bricks reflecting the names and service dates of deceased faculty and staff members. New bricks are added each year.  Its name reflects its purpose.

MIGNON HALL – Built in 1960 and upgraded in 2000 to improve fire safety, this six-story female residence hall was named in honor of Mignon M. Doran, wife of the seventh president of the University and a former faculty member.

MIGNON TOWER – Built in 1967 and upgraded in 2000 to improve fire safety, this 14-story coed residence hall was named in honor of Mignon T. Doran, wife of the seventh president of the University and a former faculty member.

MINNIE AND GARLAND ADKINS GALLERY – Located on the second floor of the Kentucky Folk Art Center, this exhibition space was named in honor of folk artists Minnie and Garland Adkins of Elliott County.

MOREHEAD STATE PUBLIC RADIO – Started in 1965 as WMKY, the first public radio station in East Kentucky, the operation has evolved into a network of three FM transmitters in Morehead, Inez and Beattyville. MSPR is headquartered at Breckinridge Hall and is a charter member of National Public Radio. Facilities include the Larry Netherton Production Room, named for a former general manager.

MORROW DRIVE – Extending in an easterly direction from Lee Cemetery Road to Playforth Place, this street was named in honor of Gov. Edwin P. Morrow, who signed legislation making the University a public institution in 1922.

MSU AT ASHLAND – Now located on the campus of Ashland Community and Technical College near downtown Ashland, this regional campus was started in 1987.

MSU AT JACKSON – Now located in the Breathitt Life Skills Center, the former Hotel Jefferson in downtown Jackson, the center is near the Lees College Campus of Hazard Community and Technical College. This regional campus opened in 1996.

MSU AT PRESTONSBURG – Established in 1991, this regional campus moved in 2004 to new facilities on the Prestonsburg campus of Big Sandy Community and Technical College. Facilities include the Margaret Lewis Learning Center.

MSU AT MOUNT STERLING – The University’s newest regional campus opened in 2003 in the Clay Community Center on the campus of Montgomery County High School/Middle School. It was expanded in 2006.

MSU AT WEST LIBERTY – Located in a two-story structure at Index near West Liberty since 2002, this regional campus was started in 1987. It also houses an adult education center.
 
MYRON DOAN CHEER PRACTICE ROOM - Formerly identified as the gymnastic room in the Academic-Athletic Center, this facility was named in 2007 in honor of Myron Doan, former dean of students and longtime coach of the University's nationally-prominent cheerleading squads.

NORMAL HALL – Built in 1967, this four-story, 40-unit student apartment building was upgraded in 2003 to improve fire safety and then fully renovated in 2004. It was named in honor of Morehead Normal School, which opened in 1887 as the University’s predecessor institution.

NUNN HALL – Built in 1969 and upgraded in 2003 to improve fire safety, this nine-story female residence hall was named in honor of Beula Nunn, wife of Gov. Louie B. Nunn.  It currently is undergoing renovation and will reopen in early 2009.

OSBORNE RESEARCH LABORATORY – Located in Ginger Hall, this facility was named in 2004 in honor of Dr. Frank H. Osborne, former faculty member.
 
PAGE DRIVE – Originally known as Tower Drive, this street extends from Battson-Oates Drive to Satellite Drive. It was named in honor of Anna Page who enrolled in October 1887 as the University’s first student.

PALMER DEVELOPMENT HOUSE – Acquired in 1965, this three-story former residence is used for administrative offices, including the MSU Foundation, Inc. It was named for John M. Palmer, Morehead industrialist and the previous owner.

PHILLIPS HOUSE – Acquired in 1996, this four-story former residence is used for administrative offices. It bears the name of Toney C. Phillips, former faculty member and previous owner.

PLAYFORTH PLACE – Extending in a northerly direction from U.S. 60 at the Academic-Athletic Center to Downing Hall, this street was named for Dr. Roscoe H. Playforth, former college dean and faculty member.

PRESIDENT’S HOME – Built in 1928, the four-story structure is the official residence of the president of the University. Twelve of the University’s 13 presidents have resided there. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

RADER HALL – Built in 1925 and renovated and expanded in 1970, this three-story classroom and office building was named in honor of Dr. Clifford Rader, former faculty member and administrator. It houses the Exelbirt Seminar Room.

REED HALL -- Built in 1974, this four-story classroom, laboratory and office building was named in honor of B. F. Reed, former member of the Board of Regents.

REGENTS HALL – Built in 1963 and upgraded in 2002 to improve fire safety, this four-story facility was named in honor of all citizens, students and faculty and staff members who have served as members of the Board of Regents. The facility was razed in 2009.

RICE SERVICE BUILDING – Built in 1965, this one-story office, garage, maintenance, and warehouse facility was named in honor of W. H. Rice, former physical plant superintendent.

RICHARDSON LIVESTOCK ARENA --  Built in 1970 and expanded in 2002, the enclosed facility bears the name of former Rowan Circuit Judge James M. Richardson, a former member of the Board of Regents.

RIGGLE ROOM – Created in 1969 with the expansion of the Adron Doran University Center, this meeting room was named in honor of Anna Mae Riggle, former dean of students.

ROGER W. BARBOUR ROOM – Located in the Special Collections section of Camden-Carroll Library, this room contains photographs, slides, lectures, manuscripts, correspondence and memorabilia related to Dr. Barbour’s 40-year career as a naturalist, author and professor of zoology at the University of Kentucky. He was a native of Morehead and an alumnus of MSU.

RONALD G. EAGLIN SPACE SCIENCE CENTER – This academic unit of the College of Science and Technology includes a $3 million Space Tracking System and the fourth bachelor’s degree program in space science in the U.S.  A $15.6 million Support Facility containing classrooms, laboratories, and offices opened in 2009. The unit was named in honor of Dr. Ronald G. Eaglin, 12th president of the University, who served from 1992 to 2005.

SADLER COURTS – Built in 1970 in the Breathitt Sports Center complex, these 14 outdoor tennis courts were named in honor of George Sadler, former tennis coach.

SATELLITE DRIVE – Originally known as Woodlawn Terrace, this street extends from Earle Clements Lane to Nunn Hall and to the Space Tracking System on the ridge above Nunn Hall. Its name honors MSU’s involvement in satellite telemetry.

SENFF NATATORIUM – Built in 1932 as one of Kentucky’s first indoor swimming pools, this historic structure was named in honor of Judge Earl W. Senff of Mt. Sterling, former member and secretary of the Board of Regents.  It was out of service from 1988 until its demolition in 2008. The distinctive frieze (low relief sculpture) on the south façade was preserved for display in the new student recreation and wellness center, scheduled to open in 2010.

SIMMS WEIGHT TRAINING CENTER – Located inside Jayne Stadium, this one-story facility was a gift from alumnus Phil Simms of Louisville, a former professional football player and network television sportscaster.

STEPHEN TIRONE SCULPTURE CONCOURSE – Located near the front entrance of Ginger Hall and the west entrance of Rader Hall, this area displays five life-sized sculptures created by faculty member Stephen Tirone to depict the University’s historic mission of training teachers and artists. The first sculpture was dedicated in 2002, the second in 2003, the third in 2004, the fourth in 2005 and the fifth in 2006. At the unveiling of the fifth sculpture, the concourse was named in honor of its creator.

STRIDER GALLERY – Located on the second floor of the Claypool-Young Art Building, this exhibition space was named in honor of Maurice Strider, former faculty member.

SUNNY BROOK GOLF COURSE – Acquired in 1965, this nine-hole public golf course is located on U.S. 60, four miles east of Morehead. It was closed in 2007 with the acquisition of Eagle Trace Golf Course.  Future use of the property has not been determined.

TERRY AND SUSAN JACOBS FIELD -- The artificial playing surface at Jayne Stadium is the second such installation to be given to the University by Terry and Susan Jacobs.  It is used primarily by the football and soccer teams.

TREE FOSSIL – Now displayed under its own shelter in front of Lappin Hall, this fossilized remnant of a swamp tree is estimated to be more than 300 million years old. It was discovered in Elliott County in 1962 by faculty members Allen Lake and James Chaplin.

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD – Extending in a westerly direction from Main Street near the Laughlin Health Building, this street now circles the Howell-McDowell Administration Building and Claypool-Young Art Building and intersects with Elizabeth Avenue. It received its current name when the institution gained university status in 1966.

VAUGHAN DRIVE – Extending in an easterly direction from University Boulevard near Cartmell Hall to Lee Cemetery Road, this street was named for Dr. William H. Vaughan, fourth president of the University, who served from 1940 to 1946.

WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY – Built in 1980 with gift funds from Ashland, Inc., this single-story structure first was used for coal testing before being converted to the official state-licensed public water analysis laboratory for the eastern half of Kentucky. Its name reflects its purpose.

WATERFIELD HALL – Built in 1960 and upgraded in 2003 to improve fire safety, this four-story structure serves as an administrative office building and a temporary residence hall. Named in honor of Lt. Gov. Harry Lee Waterfield, the building currently is out of service.

WELLNESS CENTER – Built in 1996 and expanded in 1998 and 2008, this one-story structure houses exercise science laboratories, indoor tennis courts and offices. Its name reflects its purpose.

WEST MIGNON HALL – Built in 1963 and upgraded in 2001 to improve fire safety, this four-story coed residence hall was named in honor of Mignon M. Doran, wife of the seventh president of the University and a former faculty member.

WEST SCIENCE MUSEUM – Located at Lappin Hall, this natural science museum was named in honor of Dr. Fenton T. West, former faculty member and department chair.

WETHERBY GYMNASIUM – Built in 1956, this 4,000-seat facility is home to the University’s volleyball team. It was named in honor of Gov. Lawrence W. Wetherby.

WHITE CONFERENCE ROOM – Located on the top floor of the Combs Classroom Building, this conference room was named in honor of the Harold White family of Rowan County.

WILSON HALL – Built in 1962 and upgraded in 2002 to improve fire safety, this four-story men’s residence hall was named in honor of Roger L. Wilson, former vice president. The facility was razed in 2009.

WMKY HOUSE – Built in 1968 to support Army ROTC, the three-story structure was the headquarters of WMKY Radio from 1985 to 2002 when the station relocated to Breckinridge Hall to become part of the Morehead State Public Radio network. The former residence has been out of service since 2003.

WOMEN’S SOFTBALL FIELD – Located at the northern edge of the campus in the Breathitt Sports Center complex, the field was built in 1989 and upgraded in 2001.

YANCY TELEVISION SEMINAR ROOM – Located in Breckinridge Hall, this facility was named in 2004 in honor of Thom Yancy, former faculty member.

(Revised July 18, 2010)